The Crayons’ Book of Numbers

Toddler B’s response when a toy comes to life: “I expected that.”

Her response when a book comes to life: “Again!” (Ahem… Don’t Push the Button!)

Her response when crayons come to life in a book: “Simply astonishing. Crayons can talk? Again!” She has an incredible vocabulary for being 2… 😉

crayons

The Crayons’ Book of Numbers has it all– mystery, determination, likes, dislikes, declarations, desperation! It also has ten funny, opinionated crayons that your little one has to help gather throughout the story. While counting to ten, kiddos will become familiar with their colors– purple, green, yellow, orange (“the true color of the sun,”) beige, pink, busy blue, red, black, and a slightly worried, slightly exhausted gray.

You (and your little ones) will have a hard time not enjoying this book. 

The Crayons’ Book of Numbers
Drew Daywalt/Illus. Oliver Jeffers
Grosset & Dunlap

Colors (Start Little Learn Big)

A few weeks ago we went on vacation to South Dakota. Weeks before buckling up and pulling out of the driveway, I was in full vacation preparation mode. Making lists, cleaning, making to-do lists for me (and my fantastic husband,) thoughtfully planning out our flexible itinerary together, and most importantly– making plans for what books, games, and toys to put in B’s entertainment bag. What keeps a 2 year old busy on the road for 11 hours (other than Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood videos on repeat?)

I took a chance and purchased it as a surprise for B in the car, and Colors (Start Little Learn Big) turned out to be one of the best books to keep B’s attention.FullSizeRender (27)

With 30 flaps to lift that are a part of brightly colored scenes from inside and outside the house, little ones are encouraged to look behind trees, doors, bowls, books, and curtains to discover more items that are blue, red, green, or yellow. B couldn’t stop lifting flaps and turning pages (I kid you not!)

The last two spreads have what seems to be everything in many colors– purple, pink, gold, silver, orange, and rainbow. Familiar friends like a kitty, rubber duck, dog, fish, and teddy bear can be found throughout the book, and your little one will wish they could jump into the book and play with all of the children in their joyful, vivid world.

Colors (Start Little Learn Big) (12m+)
Smriti Prasadam-Halls/Illus. Olivier Latyk
Parragon Books

Very First Book of Things to Spot

If you have a baby or toddler or know someone who does, sometimes you (or that someone you know,) will be in need of a distraction for that not-so-patient little sweetie.

The Very First Book of Things to Spot has saved us on long road trips. It has also saved us at restaurants when our food has taken a smidge longer than it normally would. Hey, we all get “hangry” sometimes. How would you feel if your applesauce pouch was gone, your baby chair was restricting and the crayons just weren’t cutting it?

Just like our well-loved board book Let’s Count, this giant board book is a keeper. It might even have the power to save the day. usborne things to spot

I remember when I pulled this book out of the box, B was immediately drawn to it because it was much bigger than the rest of her board books. She took to the floor with her brand new book (you know, because she was too little to hold it like a newspaper,) and the discovering began.

The more they know Very First Book of Things to Spot, the more they’ll spot on its adorably illustrated, fun-filled 28 pages. Bright red cars (one missing wheels) zoom across the first page. Your growing tot will be challenged to find two squirrels, a tractor, and a house with a blue roof. They’ll see a colony of penguins doing different things (one is knitting sweaters and scarves.) Through the rest of the book, there will be frogs, turtles, monkeys, bears, robots and birds– and on each page, questions leading you and your curious cuties to find new things.

I’ll admit– I’m still seeing new things every time we look at this book together. I’ll also note that I don’t wear my reading glasses 100% of the time.

Very First Book of Things to Spot
Fiona Watt/Erica Harrison/Illus. Stephen Barker
Usborne Publishing

Chicka Chicka Boom Boom

Every week, the hunt is on for B’s favorite books, or her current “Book of the Week.” She has had a lot of them over her past (almost) 2 years, and sometimes, old favorites come back out to the living room floor. One of her faves (and mine) is a book that I remember so vividly from the library at my elementary school. 20+ years later, I could still probably tell you exactly where it was shelved.

“Mom! Itch itch boom boom!” Thankfully, she wasn’t talking about an itchy owie, but her book that has pizzazz.boomThis board book ended up being the perfect addition to B’s Easter basket last year, when she was only 9ish months old. She loved it then as much as she loves it now.

The rebellious letter a and his lowercase gang (the rest of the alphabet), get a kick out of climbing the coconut tree, and once they’re all up there, their immense weight tips the tree over! As quick as a page turn, they all go boom into a jumbled, colorful pile. Injured, they all need to be helped by their uppercase family members.

The way the illustrator (Lois Ehlert), created this lively, brightly colored world for the alphabet to rule is brilliant, and the rhythm the authors came up with (kind of a “sing-chant”) is sure to keep your kiddo’s attention over and over again.

Chicka Chicka Boom Boom
Bill Martin, Jr., John Archambault/Illus. Lois Ehlert
Little Simon

Colors!

To any of you who know her (or know of her) it will not surprise you that my Mom has an awesome kid library in her office.

img_3244

What we love about Grammy Jill‘s library: Mom, lots of titles to choose from, a big rug to lay on, a comfy, old rocking chair to sit on, and no overdue fees for books you take and never return!

We’ll return it, soon, probably.

img_3245

National Geographic Kids Look & Learn: Colors! is interactive and illustrated with beautiful, brightly colored photographs.  Each section shows several examples of things that are one color (duck, bananas, school bus, etc…), and on the next spread, your little one is challenged to hunt and find all of that special color– blue, green, orange, red, or yellow.

Included in the spread are fun facts for the kids and adults. While looking for the color blue on a ferris wheel, we learned that the world’s tallest ferris wheel is higher than 40 elephants! Nooooo, thank you.

I know there are a few more National Geographic Kids Look & Learn books in Mom’s library– and I think it’s time to “check out” another!

National Geographic Kids Look & Learn: Colors!
Ruth Musgrave
National Geographic Society